People

Joshua Kretchmer

Principal Investigator

jkretchmer@gatech.edu

Joshua Kretchmer was born in San Jose, Costa Rica and grew up in Mill Valley, CA. He received his B.S. in Chemistry from UC Berkeley in 2009 and his Ph.D. as an NSF graduate research fellow from Caltech in December 2014 under the mentorship of Prof. Thomas Miller. He left Caltech for Princeton to join the group of Garnet Chan as a post-doctoral scholar. After the Chan group relocated to Caltech, he returned to finish his postdoc there. He joined the faculty of the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2019.

 

 

Yang Hong

Postdoctoral Scholar

yhong321@gatech.edu

Yang received her bachelor’s degree from Iowa State University and her PhD from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her doctoral research investigated the thermal and mechanical properties of low-dimensional materials with multi-scale theoretical approaches and machine learning methods. Following her PhD, she joined Dr. Kretchmer’s group at the beginning of 2020. Currently, she is working on understanding the underlying physics and chemistry of perovskite systems and the development of novel machine learning methodologies for the dimensionality reduction of the electronic Hamiltonian.

 

 

Ziying Cao

Graduate Student

zcao91@gatech.edu

Ziying received his bachelor’s degree from Peking University, China. His current research involves developing new techniques to simulate the quantized light – matter interaction in the areas of chemistry and materials science.

 

 

 

 

Dariia Yehorova

Graduate Student

dyehorova3@gatech.edu

Dariia received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from James Madison University.  Her current research involves the development of quantum embedding methods for the calculation of excited states and dynamics of highly correlated systems.

 

 

 

 

Kevin Adams

Undergraduate Student

kadams66@gatech.edu

Kevin is a fourth-year undergraduate student at Georgia Tech pursuing a bachelor’s degree in chemistry with a minor in materials science. His current research involves developing and applying classically isomorphic nonadiabatic methods to photochemical processes.