CHEM-E-CAr

What is Chem-E-Car?

The Chem-E-Car competition is an annual event hosted by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) where college students design, build, and test small cars powered by chemical reactions. The cars compete in regional and national competitions against other universities.

The Chem-E-Car competition is a great opportunity for students to learn about chemical engineering, teamwork, and problem-solving. It is also a chance to compete against other students from around the country and to showcase their skills and knowledge.

GT Wins at Chem-E-Car

Georgia Tech has a long history of success in the Chem-E-Car competition. In 2018, the Georgia Tech Chem-E-Car team won both the regional and national competitions. The team’s car, which was powered by a reaction between hydrogen peroxide and potassium iodide, was able to travel the farthest distance of any car in the competition.

Specific Details

The Chem-E-Car team meets every Sunday from 2-4 PM in ES&T L2160. We are always looking for new members, so if you are interested in learning more about the team or joining, please come to a meeting or contact our advisor, Dr. Galfond at galfond@gatech.edu or join the slack, GT ChemE-E-Car Slack. We welcome students from all majors and backgrounds.

If you are interested in learning more about Chem-E-Car, please come to a meeting or contact Dr Galfond. We look forward to meeting you!

Chem-E-Car is a fun and challenging way to learn about chemical engineering and teamwork. We design, build, and test small cars powered by chemical reactions. We compete in regional and national competitions against other universities. Chem-E-Car is a great way to gain hands-on experience in chemical engineering, meet new people, and have fun.

The lead sponsor for Chem-E-Car is RYAM. With three fiber lines manufacturing hardwood and softwood high-purity cellulose specialties, fluff-pulp and acetate products, their operations embody a commitment to sustainability and environmental efficiency. Annually, they produce approximately 330,000 metric tons of sustainable cellulose products.