What does being admitted mean?

This is the final blog in our three-part series looking at different admission decisions. Check out part 1 (what it does and does not mean to be deferred) and part 2 (how to handle and move forward after being denied) for more details.  

“You are in! Congratulations! Welcome!”

In the last few weeks, thousands and thousands of students have received letters, emails, or portal notifications with these words. Fireworks, falling confetti, gifs with mascots dancing (if you got one with fireworks dancing or mascots on fire, please contact the admission office immediately!). Being offered admission is a little bit easier to understand than being deferred or denied, but there is good reason the letter you received is more than one sentence. So, let’s dive into what it does and does not mean, as well as what you should do and avoid doing after being admitted. (Note: This week I’m pushing my predictions about offers of admission during Covid-19 to the end, so stay tuned!).

What does being admitted mean?  

It means “Yes! You are in! Congratulations! Welcome!” (Cue the music!)

Being admitted means the college recognizes and celebrates your academic ability and preparation, as well as your potential to contribute outside the classroom on their campus. Additionally, it means your writing, interviews, recommendations, or other supporting materials were in line with their mission and goals as an institution. This is what is commonly referred to as match or fit.

It means you have an option, a choice, a possible place to continue your education and pursue your long-term goals. This is a big deal! Congratulations!

What should you do?  

I know this is not really a 2020 thing to do, but you should CELEBRATE! You. Got. In! So regardless of whether you are convinced you are going to that college or not– celebrate. Order out from your favorite restaurant or treat yourself to something you’ve been wanting (we should all buy ourselves at least one thing around the holidays anyway, right?). You do you.

The bottom line is we are all too quick to move on to the next thing in life. You should sit with your success for just a moment.  Consider the hard work you have put in to have this choice. Then thank the people in your life who have made this possible. Family members, coaches, teachers, and so on. Send them a text, write them a note, or bring them a gift. Celebrating is always better in community- thank yours!

Attend admitted student sessions.  In the weeks and months ahead, that college is going to host a number of online or in-person sessions, tours, or virtual programs specifically for admitted students. Register for these. This is a great opportunity to hear from current students, faculty, or alumni about their experience in that community. Invaluable information.

Meet financial aid deadlines. If you were admitted through an ED plan, this will look a bit different. Likely you have a deposit deadline to meet soon and they will be sending you plenty… plenty of information and reminders here.

If you were admitted through a non-binding plan, make sure to submit your FAFSA and any other required financial aid documents as soon as possible. Financial aid is all about deadlines. Check out more on our recent podcast.

What does being admitted NOT mean?  

It does not mean you are smarter, cooler, or a better person than someone in your class, team, or neighborhood who did not get in. I’m not saying you’re not awesome, and the college who offered you admission clearly communicated that in words and graphics. Soon they will be reiterating that message in every medium known to man (phone calls, emails, letters, texts, and potentially owls, too).

But let’s be honest: it could have gone the other way for you, too. As we’ve covered, holistic admission is unpredictable. Again, some crazy qualified and talented students did not get in. They are disappointed and hurting. So, act like you’ve been there before.

It’s okay to post your excitement on social media, but a little humility goes a long way. There is a big difference between: “Got into UVA! Hoo didn’t think I’d get in.” vs. “Accepted to Colorado College. Excited and humbled.”  Whether it be online or in person, keep it classy, my friend.

What should you AVOID doing? 

Do not blow off any offer of admission as being a little thing. Too often we hear students say, “Yeah, I got it, but it’s just the University of X.” C’mon, man. What kind of logic is that? You are the one who applied there! Be thankful that you have an option! In my opinion, that is the entire goal of the college admission experience.

Avoid slacking off in classes or making drastic changes to your spring schedule now that you have been admitted. Go back and read the second or third section of that letter. Inevitably, it discusses how they will be reviewing your final fall and spring grades. They likely discuss their right to revoke admission if you do not continue the academic pattern you set over the last few years, and on which they based their decision to admit you.

If you are going to make changes to your spring schedule, especially if those move away from and not toward additional or equivalent rigor, you should contact the college before spring semester begins.

Want to read more about being offered admission? Read on. And on.

Prediction:  In general, there will be more offers of admission going out in the fall, spring, and summer this year for a few reasons. First, I expect many colleges stay flat or lose applications compared to last year. We are already seeing this in Common App data, and some schools who were up in EA/ED are seeing their gap close as the RD deadline approaches. More EA and ED admits means more closed apps earlier in the cycle, and thus more spots freed up (in other words, look for an increase in admit rate).

Recent National Clearinghouse data supports what many feared: fewer students both started (-4.4%) and returned to college this year (-13%). As a result, many colleges will be looking for ways to build back enrollment. Some will turn the transfer lever harder, but many will seek to grow their first-year class size. Again, more admits.

So, whether you have recently been admitted or you are still waiting on decisions, the good news is colleges need students! Whether you are currently sitting on an admit or waiting to hear back, I have full confidence one is coming your way. Covid has been rough on the class of 2020 and 2021. This is a bright spot. Get fired up!

Author: Rick Clark

Rick Clark is the Director of Undergraduate Admission at Georgia Tech. He has served on a number of national advisory and governing boards at the state, regional, and national level. Rick travels annually to U.S. embassies through the Department of State to discuss the admission process and landscape of higher education. He is the co-author of the book The Truth about College Admission: A Family Guide to Getting In and Staying Together, and a companion workbook published under the same title. A native of Atlanta, he earned a B.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a M.Ed. from Georgia State University. Prior to coming to Tech, Rick was on the admissions staff at Georgia State, The McCallie School and Wake Forest University. @clark2college