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Mindfulness

One of the practices that we offer are mindfulness based meditations. Scientific studies are already starting to show many physical and psychological benefits to mindfulness practices. Chief among them, and relevant to any Georgia Tech student, are the benefits to stress-relief, anxiety, and focused attention.

Our instructor, Jason Tsukahara, primarily teaches the mindfulness sessions. Here is a description provided by Jason about the practices he teaches.


Ehipassiko – “come and see”

I invite you to my meditation sessions in the the spirit of ehipassiko, “come and see” the benefits and value that mindfulness based practices can add to your life. Discover them for yourself.

Although the practices I teach are core to the Buddhist tradition (and I myself practice in the Buddhist tradition), my sessions are taught in a way that are accessible to anyone. My hope is that you discover how mindfulness can enrich your life, your productivity, your mental well-being, or your spiritual practice.

Mindful Awareness

Right now you may have the sense that your mind is dysfunctional. It is turbulent, anxious, tired, unruly, impulsive, or unintelligent. Mindfulness practice leads to an understanding that this dysfunctional mind is only the surface or outer level of your mind. Below the surface, underneath this unruly mind is mindful awareness – a quiet, calm, clear, and intelligent mind. It is always there, just obscured by the loud dysfunctional mind.

Meditation helps us to cultivate the skills needed to subdue the dysfunctional mind and reveal the calmness and clarity of mindful awareness. As you become more adept in such practices you will be able to tap into the powerful potential of mindful awareness more easily.

Feel free to reach out to me for more individual instructions: jason.tsukahara@gatech.edu

Follow me on a mindful balance